Offerings – Are They Always to be Perfect?

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Let me first start by saying, I am a student of the Torah. But I am, by no means, an expert in any way.  I have been reading Torah for six years or so and do not have all of it figured out. Period. So, everything I write or say, you need to study out for yourself. Be a Berean. I am reading the Torah daily again and this week’s parsha is Emor. I have read Emor at least six other times… but, as always, I found something this week that I have never seen before… and is the point of this post.. This verse. Leviticus 22:23. Where has this verse been hiding the last six years?  Wow… is this a contradiction? Does an offering always have to be perfect? Let’s dive in and see what we can learn here.

 

offerings 5

First let’s get the various translations of this verse.

(Bishops) A bullocke or a sheepe that hath any member superfluous or lackyng, mayest thou offer for a freewyll offering: but for a vowe it shall not be accepted.

(Geneva) Yet a bullocke, or a sheepe that hath any member superfluous, or lacking, such mayest thou present for a free offring, but for a vowe it shall not be accepted.

(KJV-1611) Either a bullocke, or a lambe that hath any thing superfluous or lacking in his parts, that mayest thou offer for a free will offring: but for a vow it shal not be accepted.

(KJV) Either a bullock or a lamb that hath any thing superfluous or lacking in his parts, that mayest thou offer for a freewill offering; but for a vow it shall not be accepted.

(KJV+) Either a bullockH7794 or a lambH7716 that hath any thing superfluousH8311 or lacking in his parts,H7038 that mayest thou offerH6213 for a freewill offering;H5071 but for a vowH5088 it shall notH3808 be accepted.H7521

(KJVA) Either a bullock or a lamb that hath any thing superfluous or lacking in his parts, that mayest thou offer for a freewill offering; but for a vow it shall not be accepted.

(WoY) Either a bullock or a lamb that hath any thing superfluous or lacking in his parts, that mayest thou offer for a freewill offering; but for a vow it shall not be accepted.

(The Scriptures 1998+) ‘As for a bull or a lamb that has any limb deformed or dwarfed you do prepare as a voluntary offering, but for a vow it is not accepted.

(NET) As for an ox48 or a sheep with a limb too long or stunted,49 you may present it as a freewill offering, but it will not be acceptable for a votiveoffering.50

(ASV) Either a bullock or a lamb that hath anything superfluous or lacking in his parts, that mayest thou offer for a freewill-offering; but for a vow it shall not be accepted.

(ESV) You may present a bull or a lamb that has a part too long or too short for a freewill offering, but for a vow offering it cannot be accepted.

(YLT) `As to an ox or a sheep enlarged or dwarfed–a willing-offering ye do make it, but for a vow it is not pleasing.

(LBP) A bullock or a lamb which has the ear or the tail cut off you may offer for a freewill offering; but for a vow it shall not be accepted.

What I gather from these verses is that indeed there is an offering that can be less than perfect… a freewill offering. But emphasis is placed always on the fact that it is not allowed for a vow. The difference is apparently very important.

What is a vow offering?

Gesenius is my go-to resource usually and he defines it as:

vow h5088

A vow is a promise to God.

What is a freewill offering?

Again, here is Gesenius’ definition:

Freewill H5071

Freewill is voluntary.

As I study this out, both of these offerings are Peace Offerings. In researching Peace offering, I read that they are unique because it is the only one that provides for a portion of the sacrifice to go to the person offering it. (How cool is that?) Another interesting aspect about the peace offering was that it was placed on top of the burnt offering (Leviticus. 3:5 and Leviticus 6:12).

It appears that Vow offerings were offered only after the vow had been fulfilled. This offering was not given to lure God into helping… it was actually to thank Him!

Jdg 11:30 And Jephthah vowed a vow to the LORD, and said, If thou wilt surely deliver the children of Ammon into my hands,
Jdg 11:31 Then whosoever comes forth of the door of my house to meet me when I return in peace from the children of Ammon shall be the LORD’S, and I will offer him up for a burnt offering.

Vows were voluntary (freewill also), but once they were made, they became obligatory to complete.

Deu 23:21  When you shall vow a vow to the LORD your God, you shall not be slack to pay it; for the LORD your God will surely require it of you; and it would be a sin in you.

The freewill offering (or voluntary offering) seems to be one that is spontaneous in nature and expresses thankfulness to God. As we see in Gesenius’ definition above, the Hebrew word actually means spontaneous. Being grateful and thankful. Isn’t it just like our God to make it easy to show that?

I hope I have caused you to dig deeper. To jump in to scripture to see if I’m understanding this right. Please don’t take my word for it and if you understand it differently, please leave a comment for me below.  I am teachable 🙂

In the meantime, Shalom!!

Trish Maroon

 


May 3rd Messianic Torah Portion Emor

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Next Shabbat, May 3rd Messianic Torah portion Emor (in Hebrew it means “say!”).  Leviticus 21:1 – 24:23; Ezekiel 44:15-31; Psalm 42; Luke 11:1-12:59.

Torah Portion Emor

Daily Torah Reading:

1st section of Parsha Emor, (Leviticus 21:1-21:15) Sunday, April 27th

2nd section of Parsha Emor, (Leviticus 21:16-22:16) Monday, April 28th

3rd section of Parsha Emor, (Leviticus 22:17-22:33) Tuesday, April 29th

4th section of Parsha Emor, (Leviticus 23:1-23:22) Wednesday, April 30th

5th section of Parsha Emor, (Leviticus 23:23-23:32) Thursday, May 1st

6th section of Parsha Emor, (Leviticus 23:33-23:44) Friday, May 2nd

7th section of Parsha Emor, (Leviticus  24:1-24:23) Shabbat, May 3rd

Torah Studies for Children:

31_Emor_Kinder

31_Emor_Shabbat

disclosure

Tools for Adults Studying Torah

I highly recommend reading scripture each year from a different Hebraic translation. Below are the different versions I’ve read:

2013 – 2014 Torah Cycle:  Schocken Bible.  I have to tell you I DO NOT like the commentary part, but I love the language of the Scriptures. Just being honest in my evaluation of the translation.  I like having a book to hold, but if you want to read it online, here is a pdf.

2012 – 2013 Torah Cycle: Onkelos. This is a GREAT set of 5 books.  I refer back to these regularly.  It is my favorite. Period.

2009 – 2012 Torah Cycle: Stone’s Chumash.  My second favorite.

I use the Complete Jewish Bible online all the time for reference.  If you are like me, I need to hold a book!  Here is one on Amazon.

I have several different sets of commentary (Onkelos and Stone’s Chumash are my favorites for the Torah Portions).  For the Tanakh (rest of the Old Testament), I use Keil and Delitzsch.

In my humble opinion, the absolute BEST translation of the Gospels is Delitzsch’s Hebrew Gospels.

Again, I use many different translations, but this is one I use regularly Complete Jewish Bible as well as The Scriptures.

Just about anything from Artscroll… I could go broke at this store! (Note, if you visit this store on Shabbat, they will be closed… they honor the Sabbath)!

eSword.  It is a free Bible Study Software.  I got mine from this church years ago and have never received one piece of junk mail due to it. This software has multiple version of scripture (and you know how I love to read different translations) including KJV, Scriptures, JPS, Peshitta, etc. And it has several different lexicons including Strongs, BDB and Thayers.  I highly recommend you get this software and it is free.

Blue Letter Bible.  Is a website that I take the Strong’s number from eSword and go search to see how the word has been used in other verses. It has the Gesenius’ definition of Hebrew words, which I just love!

Commentaries for Torah Portions:

Lists of Messianic Commentary on Torah Portions:

Torah Portion studies for Children: **

I am always looking for my next year’s translation to read Torah from.  If you have a great Hebraic perspective Bible that I did not list here, please leave me a comment below!

Until next week… Shalom Mishpocha!

Trish


April 27 Messianic Torah Portion Emor

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This coming Shabbat’s Torah portion is Emor (in Hebrew it means “say!”):  Leviticus 21:1 – 24:23; Ezekiel 44:15-31; Psalm 42; Luke 11:1 – 12:59

Torah study

Torah and Wailing Wall

Daily Reading:

Parshat Emor, 1st Portion (April 21) Leviticus 21:1-21:15

Parshat Emor, 2nd Portion (April 22) Leviticus 21:16-22:16

Parshat Emor, 3rd Portion (April 23) Leviticus 22:17-22:33

Parshat Emor, 4th Portion (April 24) Leviticus 23:1-23:22

Parshat Emor, 5th Portion (April 25) Leviticus 23:23-23:32

Parshat Emor, 6th Portion (April 26) Leviticus 23:33-23:44

Parshat Emor, 7th Portion (April 27) Leviticus 24:1-24:23

Torah Studies for Children:

Kindergarten Level: 31_Emor_Kinder

Elementary Level: 31_Emor_Shabbat

Until next time… Shalom!